HOW GOD DEALS WITH HIS PEOPLE IN THE OLD AND NEW TESTAMENTS: Lesson 2 of 8

Lesson 2

Deut. 5:1-4

  1. And Moses called all Israel, and said unto them, Hear, O Israel, the statutes and judgments which I speak in your ears this day, that ye may learn them, and keep, and do them.
  2. The LORD our God made a covenant with us in Horeb.
  3. The LORD made not this covenant with our fathers, but with us, even us, who are all of us here alive this day.
  4. The LORD talked with you face to face in the mount out of the midst of the fire,

Note particularly in verse 3 that God did not make the covenant with anyone but Israel.

Deut. 7: 12-15 says “IF ye hearken….

12 Wherefore it shall come to pass, if ye hearken to these judgments, and keep, and do them, that the LORD thy God shall keep unto thee the covenant and the mercy which he sware unto thy fathers:

13 And he will love thee, and bless thee, and multiply thee: he will also bless the fruit of thy womb, and the fruit of thy land, thy corn, and thy wine, and thine oil, the increase of thy kine, and the flocks of thy sheep, in the land which he sware unto thy fathers to give thee.

14 Thou shalt be blessed above all people: there shall not be male or female barren among you, or among your cattle.

15 And the LORD will take away from thee all sickness, and will put none of the evil diseases of Egypt, which thou knowest, upon thee; but will lay them upon all them that hate thee.

Deut. 11:22-28—IF ye shall diligently keep all these commandments….

22 For if ye shall diligently keep all these commandments which I command you, to do them, to love the LORD your God, to walk in all his ways, and to cleave unto him;

23 Then will the LORD drive out all these nations from before you, and ye shall possess greater nations and mightier than yourselves.

24 Every place whereon the soles of your feet shall tread shall be yours: from the wilderness and Lebanon, from the river, the river Euphrates, even unto the uttermost sea shall your coast be.

25 There shall no man be able to stand before you: for the LORD your God shall lay the fear of you and the dread of you upon all the land that ye shall tread upon, as he hath said unto you.

26 Behold, I set before you this day a blessing and a curse;

27 A blessing, if ye obey the commandments of the LORD your God, which I command you this day:

28 And a curse, if ye will not obey the commandments of the LORD your God, but turn aside out of the way which I command you this day, to go after other gods, which ye have not known.

QUESTIONS:

  1. What law were the Israelites under when they first entered Egypt (Gen. 47:11)?
  2. Which law did the twelve tribes of Israel submit to while they were in Egypt for 400 years (Gen. 47:11)?
  3. What law were the Israelites under the first day they crossed over the Red Sea?
  4. What would happen to any nation if it had no national laws?
  5. What law did God give to govern the physical nation of Israel (Deut. 5:1-3)?
  6. What did God call the law that He gave to the nation of Israel (Heb. 8:7-9)?
  7. For whom did God make the Law of Moses (Deut. 5:2)?
  8. For whom did God not make the Law of Moses (Deut. 5:3)?
  9. Did God give the Law of Moses to anyone but the physical nation of Israel (Gal. 5:1-4)?
  10. What did God promise the Israelites He would give them if they kept his covenant (Deut. 11:22-24)?
  11. Which non-Israelite prophets, who prophesied before or during the time the Jews, were not under the Law of Moses? The non-Jewish nations (Gentiles) were not under the law of Moses, but God dealt with them through prophets.  Which prophets (specific prophets) would this have included?

You might think of a timeline which would look something like this:

  • Prophets ============================================>Christ
  • Mosaic (OT) Law =====================>Christ
  • Christ ===========>Today
  1. Consider that Abraham is our example of faith. Was he under the Law of Moses?  You may have to use the timeline here.
  2. Of all the examples of faith in Heb. 11:1-40,  how many of those lived under the Law of Moses?
  3. Reading from 1 Cor. 10:1-5,  what put the Israelites “into Moses?”

HOW GOD DEALS WITH HIS PEOPLE IN THE OLD AND NEW TESTAMENTS: Lesson 1 of 8

LESSON 1

People have been puzzled for generations about whether both Old and New Testaments are still in effect today. Do we have to obey both of them? Do we still have to go to Jerusalem three times a year? Do we still have to offer animal sacrifice for our sins? There is an Old Testament and a New Testament (Heb. 7:22; Heb. 8:1-5; Heb. 8:6-13; Heb. 9:14-15; Heb. 12:24).

Continue reading HOW GOD DEALS WITH HIS PEOPLE IN THE OLD AND NEW TESTAMENTS: Lesson 1 of 8

WHY A NEW LAW?

The book of Hebrews repeats a central reason that God gave a new law four specific times.  He first tells us that if it were not weak and unprofitable, we would not have had a need for a High Priest to arise after the order of Melchisedec.  What did its weakness and unprofitableness prevent the Law from doing?

If therefore perfection were by the Levitical priesthood, (for under it the people received the law,) what further need was there that another priest should rise after the order of Melchisedec, and not be called after the order of Aaron?  (Heb. 7:11).

We note the problem.  Perfection was not possible under the Levitical priesthood.  Thus there had to be a new high priest who could give the New Testament. He gives the same reason again for stating that the Old Testament law was weak and unprofitable.

For there is verily a disannulling of the commandment going before for the weakness and unprofitableness thereof.  For the law made nothing perfect, but the bringing in of a better hope did; by the which we draw nigh unto God (Heb. 7:18-19).

We note here that the same clarification is offered again for giving the New Testament.  The law made nothing perfect.  A third time he gives the same explanation – the Old Testament priests were offering “. . .gifts and sacrifices, that could not make him that did the service perfect, as pertaining to the conscience” (Heb. 9:9).  A fourth time he offers the same truth:

For the law having a shadow of good things to come, and not the very image of the things, can never with those sacrifices which they offered year by year continually make the comers thereunto perfect (Heb. 10:1).

Who could rightly deny that making men perfect is a primary reason for giving the New Testament?

He prefaces these statements above in chapters 7 through 9 by directing God’s children to the goal of the disciple in chapter 6 when he said:

Therefore leaving the principles of the doctrine of Christ, let us go on unto perfection; not laying again the foundation of repentance from dead works, and of faith toward God (Heb. 6:1).

His purpose is clear and obvious.  Jesus is our example and captain of our faith who attained that very goal.

For it became him, for whom are all things, and by whom are all things, in bringing many sons unto glory, to make the captain of their salvation perfect through sufferings (Heb. 2:10).

Our Father made Jesus perfect.  He was not born perfect, for he was made perfect ‘through sufferings.’  He learned obedience by the things which is suffered (Heb. 5:8).  Though he was a Son, he had to learn the same way all of God’s children learn.  As he ran the race ahead of us (was ‘made perfect’) he became the author of eternal salvation to all who will obey him (Heb. 5:9).  “For the law made nothing perfect, but the bringing in of a better hope did; by the which we draw nigh unto God” (Heb. 7:19).  Jesus and the new covenant is that better hope which does make men perfect, like Christ (Luke 6:40).  Thus the Old Law had to be done away to make way for the New Law, the perfect law of liberty.  Only a perfect law can make men perfect.