INTO ALL THE WORLD—Part 3

DEALING WITH DISCOURAGEMENT

Even though I have dealt with people all over the world since late 1968, lately I have been wearied by my sister’s continual requests for medical help (anything ranging from “diagnosis please” to Band-Aids).  They ask for pain tablets, powder for heat or other rashes, creams for fungus, milk or vitamins for heat boils—all this from every one of them–so much so that I finally told one sister I wouldn’t/couldn’t deal with her mother’s painful leg when I had no way of knowing what actually happened.  I was beginning to feel smothered—mainly because it seems I can never just have a normal conversation with anyone anymore.

Last Sunday night, after our evening services, I simply disappeared and went back to the apartment, and of course one younger lady knocked on my door to ask to come in to talk.  I was kind about it, but I told her no.  About half an hour later, after I had rested a bit, two others came just to chat a while. That was refreshing.  They did not want me to do anything, other than listen to their report of what they had been doing the past week.

The very next day in my evening English class, I was trying to help the few ladies who come for extra practice to know how to study the assigned Scripture reading so they will not just call words they don’t understand.

The reading happened to be Deuteronomy 1:9-15.  At the time it didn’t dawn on me to think of the class exercise as an answer to prayer, but later I realized it was.  I started by asking the ladies to read the passage to me in their own language first and then asked them some questions to help them understand what it was about.

Who is speaking?  How do you find that information?  To whom is he speaking?  What is the problem?  What was the solution?  How many men were chosen to be judges or overseers?  How did God bless these men to be able to do the work?

I helped the sisters to conjure a picture in their minds of what it might be like to judge more than a million people from morning to evening—day-in-and-day-out.  Some would take Moses’ advice (judgment or command) and some might not, yet they required Moses’ time to ask.

Then I asked them who had suggested to Moses that his job was too great to endure.  They all smiled when I reminded them it was his father-in-law, Jethro, (Exo. 18:13-24). I showed them how to look for Jethro’s name in computer search engines and where to read more about him.  Only a few have smart phones, and even fewer have computers, but they could see how I searched on the class computer. They could read the passages I pointed out.  They could answer the questions.

I used my Bible Soft program to search some related passages, showing how that Moses had been a prophet and a judge for God’s people since they left Egypt, but after forty+ years he grew weary of their continual coming.  He even dared to ask God if he had given birth to the Israelites and had carried them in his womb.  That was discouragement at its height.  I asked them if we sometimes discourage each other like Jethro and the people had discouraged Moses.  In my own mind, I wondered if I could truly be used, and yes, even abused at times without complaining.  Do I take my problems to God, or do I murmur like the Israelite people did?  Maybe this was a lesson to help me not to be discouraged with “their continual coming.”

INTO ALL THE WORLD – part 1

If you are wondering if God has plans for you as a teacher in “all the world,” then maybe this short evaluation will help you make a choice (Matt. 28:18-20).

Growing up, I had a lot of dreams about what I wanted to be.  Having read accounts of Albert Schweitzer and his outstanding work in my school studies, I was inspired to adopt lots of children the way he had.  Children are helpless without someone to stand for them, but my lack of connections or money would not make that dream possible.  Some time later, I set my sights to be a fabric designer or a schoolteacher.  I loved to paint and would eventually teach art, music and English in more than one state.  The philosopher part of my career would not blossom like I thought it might because my husband to be would have his own ideas and plans.  However, there was one career that was never on my radar.

I never seriously considered being, or marrying, anyone who lived on foreign soil even though I admired Albert Schweitzer very much.  Maybe that was because Albert Schweitzer was only in LIFE MAGAZINE or POST; he was not ‘real.’  Our family did have a favorite cousin whose husband had worked and died in South Africa and who had written and published book about it.  As a young girl, accounts of her life seemed brutal—too harsh to my taste.

Not that living outside the state of Texas was a bad thing, I just saw the ones who left home as those who weren’t real.  Reading that Schweitzer was living in a grass hut when a goat had come during the night to eat the paper on which he had just written a symphony made me cringe.  Dedicated men and women who chose to “go into all the world) had to live differently than everyone else.  It just wasn’t something I saw myself doing. It wasn’t something I could ever see myself capable of doing.

As I was growing up, my family was well known in the community; to me, dad and mother were strong leaders and sages all rolled into one.  My dad’s career was not like most other men’s.  He was set apart as a Government employee for soil conservation and a prudent landowner too—not wealthy, but comfortable.

It’s really comforting to know God has a way of guiding our paths (Prov. 20:24; Eph. 1:11-12). During my childhood I went to church because my mom and dad loved the Lord and his people, and because that was just what we did.  We never missed.  I loved going to church too and enjoyed answering questions in Bible classes.  When I was 14, one of the elders approached me to see if I would be willing to teach a class of fourth graders during vacation Bible school the next morning.  I don’t remember why they asked me at the last minute, but likely it was because the main teacher became ill.  Something in me said, “Beth, you can do this,” and so I did.  Looking back now, I am sure my parents prayed a lot for me that week.

The seed was planted.

Before that, I had never once thought about being a Bible class teacher but that little request would be a mustard seed planted in my heart that would be watered in the coming years.

When I went away to college at age 18, I happily took a regular Wednesday evening class of 20 little first graders at another elder’s request.

It was that group of kids that really captured my heart.

It was during that semester of my life that I dedicated my “heart and mind” to do whatever God wanted me to do.

I determined to follow the Lord and put on the new man (Eph. 2:15; Eph. 4:24; Col. 3:10), thus watering the seed of faith that was planted earlier by that first elder who saw hope in me.

DARING THE DINOSAURS AND DRAGONS

DO WE DARE[i] THE DINOSAURS AND DRAGONS?

There still is some controversy surrounding the name Brontosaurus. When Marsh discovered some partial remains of this dinosaur in 1877 he named it Apatosaurus Ajax after the Greek god Ajax.[ii] However, when he discovered a more complete skeleton two years later, he named it Brontosaurus Excelsus.[iii] 

In 1903, scientists realized that these two specimens were actually the same type of dinosaur. With that being the case, according to the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature, the oldest name would be the correct one: however, the Brontosaurus name seemed to be more agreeable with the imagination of the public and continues to be used to this day.[iv]

An older illustration of several brontosaurus dinosaurs grazing in water.

Several computer simulations have been conducted on how the tail worked on the Brontosaurus.[v] One simulation—introduced in the 1997 issue of Discover Magazine—showed that the tail of these creatures behaved much like a bull whip does, and that by “cracking” its tail like a bullwhip, then this creature could produce a cracking sound that was over 200 decibels, or louder than the firing of a cannon.

JOB 40:15-24 Speaks of One Such Magnificent Land Animal

  1. Behold now behemoth, which I made with thee; he eateth grass as an ox.
  2. Lo now, his strength is in his loins, and his force is in the navel of his belly.
  3. He moveth his tail like a cedar: the sinews of his stones are wrapped together.
  4. His bones are as strong pieces of brass; his bones are like bars of iron.
  5. He is the chief of the ways of God: he that made him can make his sword to approach unto him.
  6. Surely the mountains bring him forth food, where all the beasts of the field play.
  7. He lieth under the shady trees, in the covert of the reed, and fens.
  8. The shady trees cover him with their shadow; the willows of the brook compass him about.
  9. Behold, he drinketh up a river, and hasteth not: he trusteth that he can draw up Jordan into his mouth.
  10. He taketh it with his eyes: his nose pierceth through snares (Job 40:15-24).

There are so many areas for discussion and controversy here. Questions abound, but the scriptural accounts seem to bear out what scientist have found.

    1. Was there enough vegetation to sustain them indefinitely?
    2. Should we believe man lived contemporaty with these beasts?
    3. Dinosaurs fascinate children, so why do we not delve more in to sacred literature to educate them.
    4. Is there any animal in secular history similar to these dinosaurs?
    5. With the presumed fierceness and fearlessness they possessed, what caused them to become extinct?
    6. Could this now extinct animal have been called by any other name?
    7. What ancient culture claims such a ferocious beast?

Read the following biblical account carefully and consider that some early  King James translators may not have understood because they had not lived with such beasts.  Several lesser animals were thought to be what the Lord calls Leviathan.

Job 41:1-34 Speaks of a Savage Sea Animal

  1. Canst thou draw out leviathan with an hook? or his tongue with a cord which thou lettest down?
  2. Canst thou put an hook into his nose? or bore his jaw through with a thorn?
  3. Will he make many supplications unto thee? will he speak soft words unto thee?
  4. Will he make a covenant with thee? wilt thou take him for a servant for ever?
  5. Wilt thou play with him as with a bird? or wilt thou bind him for thy maidens
  6. Shall the companions make a banquet of him? shall they part him among the merchants?
  7. Canst thou fill his skin with barbed irons? or his head with fish spears?
  8. Lay thine hand upon him, remember the battle, do no more.
  9. Behold, the hope of him is in vain: shall not one be cast down even at the sight of him?
  10. None is so fierce that dare stir him up: who then is able to stand before me?
  11. Who hath prevented me, that I should repay him? whatsoever is under the whole heaven is mine.
  12. I will not conceal his parts, nor his power, nor his comely proportion.
  13. Who can discover the face of his garment? or who can come to him with his double bridle?
  14. Who can open the doors of his face? his teeth are terrible round about.
  15. His scales are his pride, shut up together as with a close seal.
  16. One is so near to another, that no air can come between them.
  17. They are joined one to another, they stick together, that they cannot be sundered.
  18. By his neesings a light doth shine, and his eyes are like the eyelids of the morning.
  19. Out of his mouth go burning lamps, and sparks of fire leap out.
  20. Out of his nostrils goeth smoke, as out of a seething pot or caldron.
  21. His breath kindleth coals, and a flame goeth out of his mouth.
  22. In his neck remaineth strength, and sorrow is turned into joy before him.
  23. The flakes of his flesh are joined together: they are firm in themselves; they cannot be moved.
  24. His heart is as firm as a stone; yea, as hard as a piece of the nether
  25. When he raiseth up himself, the mighty are afraid: by reason of breakings they purify themselves.
  26. The sword of him that layeth at him cannot hold: the spear, the dart, nor the habergeon.
  27. He esteemeth iron as straw, and brass as rotten wood.
  28. The arrow cannot make him flee: slingstones are turned with him into stubble.
  29. Darts are counted as stubble: he laugheth at the shaking of a spear.
  30. Sharp stones are under him: he spreadeth sharp pointed things upon the mire.
  31. He maketh the deep to boil like a pot: he maketh the sea like a pot of ointment.
  32. He maketh a path to shine after him; one would think the deep to be hoary.
  33. Upon earth there is not his like, who is made without fear.
  34. He beholdeth all high things:he is a king over all the children of pride.

[i] https://www.freethesaurus.com/daring“>FreeThesaurus.com

[ii] <a href=”https://www.greekmythology.com/Myths/Mortals/Ajax/ajax.html”>Ajax: GreekMythology.com</a> – Oct 05, 2017

[iii] https://www.newdinosaurs.com/apatosaurus/

[iv] https://www.newdinosaurs.com/apatosaurus/

[v] https://www.livescience.com/52538-supersonic-sauropods.html 

Mother’s Love

Death is inevitable, but do we have a right to hasten it? As children, should we abandon our parents and grandparents who have given so much to our care and training?  Have we forgotten how weak and helpless we were at first?  How many years did our parents suffer through our growth to adulthood?

The English word “proclivity” meaning “tendency” or “inclination,” is one that seems to get singled out for bad usage. If I worry a lot, I have a proclivity toward worry or depression.

What if I am over 80, have even mild dementia, and limited physical abilities, should I worry what may happen to me in today’s world? What will my children be tempted to do to “let me go” on to my reward?  Will they be tempted to hasten that departure?

Please go to the original article to make comments.  Thanks!

Life Is Like That

Photo taken from Fragrant Wood Gallery Window Photo taken from Fragrant Wood Gallery Window

A reminder of how much your Mother loves you.

A son wants to bring his Mother into the forest and leave her there to fend for herself because her Mother is terminally ill and he is too tired to take care of her.

Leading her through the thick of the forest, he noticed that his Mother breaks every branch that they passed by.

Curious, he ask his Mother why is she breaking the branches?

The Mother answered her son loving: “Son, I break the branches as a guide for you to follow so that you won’t get lost on the way out.”

Translated from Filipino story:
Isang paalala kung gaano kayo kamahal ng inyong ina..
May isang anak na gustong iligaw ang kanyang INA sa gubat dahil sa sakit nitong wala nang lunas at pagod na rin siyang mag-alaga dito, Ipinasan niya ang…

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