How Sweet the Words

Rick Ritter and the Four Corners church at Stillwell have some of the few sound preachers and churches in Oklahoma.

hymnstudiesblog

harry presley

(photograph of Harry Presley)

HOW SWEET THE WORDS

“How sweet are Thy words unto my taste!  Yea, sweeter than honey to my mouth” (Ps. 119:103)

     INTRO.:  A song which declares how God’s words should be sweet unto our taste is “How Sweet the Words.”  The text was written by Harry Presley, who was born on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 27, 1924, near Stilwell, OK, in the home of his parents John M. and Inez Richardson Presley. Growing up in the Stilwell area, he received his schooling from the Stilwell public schools and graduated from high school in 1942. Following his baptism into Christ on Sept. 17, 1950, he served in the U. S. Army in Korea during the Korean War. After his return, he began preaching the gospel in 1956, doing fill-in work for local congregations. On Dec. 17, 1961, he started preaching full-time for the Four Corners church of…

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Do You Love the Lord?

A special teacher, preacher and song leader too.

hymnstudiesblog

tom holland

(Tom Holland)

“DO YOU LOVE THE LORD?”

“Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind” (Matt. 22:37)

     INTRO.: A hymn which encourages us to love God with all our heart, soul, and mind is “Do You Love the Lord?” The text was written by Thomas H. Holland, who was born in 1931 to Ross R. and Elzie Flanagan Holland, graduating from Freed-Hardeman College (now University) in 1951. His further education included a B.A. (David Lipscomb College), an M.A. (Abilene Christian University), and a Ph.D. (Southern Illinois University). His wife’s name is Linda D. Holland.  A well known preacher and lecturer among Churches of Christ, he is the author of numerous books on homiletics and sermon outlines. One website listed the following sermon outline books by Tom Holland: Essential Elements of Expository Preaching, Steps into the…

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This Is Not My Place of Resting

I was in college when I first heard of brother Showalter. In fact the first apartment my husband and I rented after we married was with brother Showalter’s younger brother’s widow.

hymnstudiesblog

this is not my place

THIS IS NOT MY PLACE OF RESTING

“For here have we no continuing city, but we seek one to come” (Hebrews 13:14)

     INTRO.:  A hymn which urges us, since we have no continuing city here on earth, to seek the one that is to come is “This Is Not My Place of Resting.”  The text was written by a Scottish Free Church preacher named Horatius Bonar (1808-1889).  It was published in The Bible Hymn-Book of 1845.  Other well known hymns by Bonar that have appeared in our books include “For Me He Careth,” “Go, Labor On,” “Here, O My Lord, I See Thee,” “I Heard the Voice of Jesus Say,” and “No Shadows Yonder.”  Several tunes have been used with “This Is Not My Place of Resting.”  The traditional one (Vesper Flotow) was composed in 1875 by Friedrich von Flotow.  Another (Talmar), which has also been used with a…

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He Loves Me

It is good to know the background of our hymns.

hymnstudiesblog

sanderson02

(photograph of L. O. Sanderson)

“HE LOVES ME”

“…Christ also hath loved us, and gave Himself for us…” (Eph. 5:2)

     INTRO.:  A hymn which reminds us that Christ has loved us and given Himself for us is “He Loves Me” (#696 in Hymns for Worship Revised; cf. #136 in Sacred Selections for the Church).  The text was written, under the penname of Vana R. Raye, and the tune was arranged both by Lloyd Otis Sanderson, who was born the middle of five children to James P. and Lucy Ann Hunt Sanderson on May 18, 1901, in Craighead County near Jonesboro, AR, in an old log house on the home place that his father, who was a singing teacher, had inherited.  His father belonged to the Methodist church, but his mother was a member of the church of Christ. During his time at home, the family had a…

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