WE SING

The same year I finished the last part of my M.Ed. degree, I also taught at Alabama Christian Academy while our elder son and daughter attended Alabama Christian College, later called Faulkner University. Our two youngest children attended elementary school at ACA. Our elder son met his future wife at Faulkner that year, and the three sang in the Alabama Christian College chorus together.

Keith Lancaster’s A’ Capella group was a regular feature at the school, often appearing on special programs. Someone mentioned that the lead bass singer, Rodney Britt, made the flatware vibrate on the tables even when he spoke.

Dayspring (Job 38:12Luke 1:78), was another singing group at Faulkner featuring four young men who raised funds for Alabama Christian College by travelling to sing for interested audiences. Our elder son, his two roommates and another young man often sang by appointment. We enjoyed hearing them live when they were back at home, and we enjoyed listening to their cassette tapes.

As you can see, music filled our lives day after day. We sang because we were happy (James 5:13), and those times were often. We sang while riding in the car together, and after our daily Bible readings. Sometimes we invited friends over just to sing together. Today, we still sing often, but we also take a more serious approach to Christian music, as we sing and make melody in our heats to the LORD (Col. 3:16-17 KJV). Colossians 3:17 directs Christians this way: “And whatsoever ye do in word or deed, do all in the name (by the authority) of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God and the Father by him.”

If we do not have book, chapter and verse for everything we teach, then we must reconsider what we are doing. We determined to speak where the Bible speaks and be silent where the Bible is silent. How could we not understand that our singing also must be to this end? Our first determination was to sing as the LORD directs. We later realized that some songs actually were loaded with false doctrines, which needed to be abandoned or corrected to be sure we were not teaching each other the wrong things (Eph. 5:19). Singing is serious because it is actually teaching each other.

As I was considering some of the newer religious songs that have come out, I came across a pitiful little boy’s stage appearance on America’s Got Talent. No doubt, the deeper meaning in this prayer song is something the child probably did not understand at age four. What about age ten? Without a doubt, there are more than enough doctrinal issues with the way “Open the Eyes of My Heart, Lord” is done on stage with instrumental music. My reason for including it here is to cause us to think of the, spiritual implications of the words. What a pitiful child! His mother’s drug addiction caused so much suffering. Spiritual sight could be so much more valuable to this young boy than physical sight. At least his uncle found where he was and adopted him before he had his second birthday. May the LORD bless us all to open the eyes of our hearts to see His purpose and promises for our lives.

Beth Johnson

Chennai Teacher Training School

Women’s Studies

Muliebral Viewpoint

Articles and Books by Beth Johnson

RETHINKING THE GREAT COMMISSION

Baptism does not make one a disciple of Christ.  In John 4:1-3, we see that Jesus made and baptized more disciples than John.  Note that the verse does not say that Jesus made disciples by baptizing them.

In Matthew 28:19, we are commanded first to make disciples (KJV mistakenly translates this teach) and then we are commanded to baptize them.  Who are the ‘them’ but “them disciples?”  Luke 6:40 tells us we make disciples by converting them to want to be like the one Master—Jesus Christ.

Continue reading RETHINKING THE GREAT COMMISSION

JESUS PROPHESIED TO BE THE KING OF THE KINGDOM

Jesus was Prophesied to be the King of the Kingdom 

I saw in the night visions, and, behold, one like the Son of man came with the clouds of heaven, and came to the Ancient of days, and they brought him near before him. 14. And there was given him dominion, and glory, and a kingdom, that all people, nations, and languages, should serve him: his dominion is an everlasting dominion, which shall not pass away, and his kingdom that which shall not be destroyed (Dan. 7:13-14).

What does Matthew 28:18 say?  “And Jesus came and spake unto them, saying, All power is given unto me in heaven and in earth.”  After Jehovah gave Jesus (the son) all authority he would send the Holy Spirit by Jesus.

Continue reading JESUS PROPHESIED TO BE THE KING OF THE KINGDOM

KING OF THE JEWS

And he bearing his cross went forth into a place called the place of a skull, which is called in the Hebrew Golgotha: Where they crucified him, and two other with him, on either side one, and Jesus in the midst. And Pilate wrote a title, and put it on the cross. And the writing was, JESUS OF NAZARETH THE KING OF THE JEWS. This title then read many of the Jews: for the place where Jesus was crucified was nigh to the city: and it was written in Hebrew, and Greek, and Latin. Then said the chief priests of the Jews to Pilate, Write not, The King of the Jews; but that he said, I am King of the Jews. Pilate answered, What I have written I have written (John 19:17-22).

The term, “King of the Jews” is used 18 times in the New Testament scriptures—each time referring to Jesus.  At the time of Jesus’ birth (Matt. 2:2), there was a common belief that some remarkable person was about to emerge in Judea. The Jews were anxiously looking for the coming of the Messiah. By computing the time mentioned by Daniel (Dan. 9:25-27), they knew that the period was approaching when He would appear. The person they were looking for was supposedly going to be a temporal prince, and they were expecting that He would deliver them from Roman bondage. It was natural that this expectation should spread into other countries. At the time, many Jews lived in Egypt, Rome or Greece.  Also, many had gone to Eastern countries, and in every place they carried their sacred writings, and talked of their expectation that some noteworthy person was about to arise.

The Jews were all looking for the kingdom of God (Luke 3:15; 17:20; John 1:41). Daniel had prophesied the world-ruling kingdom of God would be established in the days of Rome (Dan. 2:44). By the time Christ was born, Rome had ruled the world for about 80 years, and the Jews and even many in the world knew the kingdom could come any time. If the Jews could find the king, they could find the kingdom (John 1:41; John 3:28; John 4:28-29; John 4:42; John 7:41; John 10:24). Although the Jews looked for the kingdom, because of envy, they crucified the very one the multitudes identified as their king.

Whether or not Pilate was convinced of what he wrote, he used three languages to write for the world to see that Jesus was the king of the Jews (Luke 23:38)! Pilate rejected the Jews’ demand to alter the writing or remove it (John 19:22).

Even the thief testified that Jesus’ kingdom would be set up after His death (Luke 23:42). Peter accused the Jews of crucifying their king (Acts 4:10), and on the day of Pentecost, Peter proved that God had foreordained the king of the kingdom would be put to death (Act 2:23). It was not until after His death that Jesus was crowned with all power in heaven and earth (Matt. 28:18). Jesus is king over His spiritual kingdom. Only His citizens can claim Him as their king (John 18:36). Jesus was made both Lord and Christ. The name Christ means anointed one. Jesus is both Lord and king (Acts 2:36). He is Lord over all men (Acts 10:36).

Jesus has been exalted with authority above every authority not only on this earth but also in heaven (Matt. 28:18). He is approved as Lord not only in this life but also in that which to come (Eph. 4:21). Jesus is not seated as king of a physical nation (John 8:23). He is king of the Jews but only in a spiritual sense (Rom. 9:6-7). His kingdom is not of this world; it is not a physical kingdom (John 18:36). He is king of all people who are spiritual Jews (Rom. 2:28-29). He is king only of those who are translated into His marvelous kingdom (Col. 1:13).

The king of the Jews has made all His subjects priests to offer spiritual sacrifices (1 Pet. 2:5-9; Heb. 13:15). If His people suffer with Him, He will make them kings to reign with Him (2 Tim. 2:12). If His citizens overcome the battle with Satan He will give them power over the nations as He received of His Father (Rev. 2:26-27). If His citizens overcome they will reign with Him forever and ever (Rev. 22:5).

Blessed be the King of the Jews! (Luke 19:38).

–Beth Johnson

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KING OF THE JEWS

And he bearing his cross went forth into a place called the place of a skull, which is called in the Hebrew Golgotha: Where they crucified him, and two other with him, on either side one, and Jesus in the midst. And Pilate wrote a title, and put it on the cross. And the writing was, JESUS OF NAZARETH THE KING OF THE JEWS. This title then read many of the Jews: for the place where Jesus was crucified was nigh to the city: and it was written in Hebrew, and Greek, and Latin. Then said the chief priests of the Jews to Pilate, Write not, The King of the Jews; but that he said, I am King of the Jews. Pilate answered, What I have written I have written (John 19:17-22).

The term, “King of the Jews” is used 18 times in the New Testament scriptures-each time referring to Jesus. At the time of Jesus’ birth (Matt 2:2), there was a common belief that some remarkable person was about to emerge in Judea. The Jews were anxiously looking for the coming of the Messiah. By computing the time mentioned by Daniel (Dan 9:25-27), they knew that the period was approaching when He would appear. The person they were looking for was supposedly going to be a temporal prince, and they were expecting that He would deliver them from Roman bondage. It was natural that this expectation should spread into other countries. At the time, many Jews lived in Egypt, Rome or Greece. Also, many had gone to Eastern countries, and in every place they carried their sacred writings, and talked of their expectation that some noteworthy person was about to arise.

The Jews were all looking for the kingdom of God (Luke 3:15; 17:20; John 1:41). Daniel had prophesied the world ruling kingdom of God would be established in the days of Rome (Dan 2:44). By the time Christ was born, Rome had ruled the world for about 80 years, and the Jews and even many in the world knew the kingdom could come any time. If the Jews could find the king, they could find the kingdom (John 1:41; 3:28; 4:28-29; 4:42; 7:41; 10:24). Although the Jews looked for the kingdom, because of envy, they crucified the very one the multitudes identified as their king.

Whether or not Pilate was convinced of what he wrote, he used three languages to write for the world to see that Jesus was the king of the Jews (Luke 23:38)! Pilate rejected the Jews’ demand to alter the writing or remove it (John 19:22).

Even the thief testified that Jesus’ kingdom would be set up after His death (Luke 23:42). Peter accused the Jews of crucifying their king (Acts 4:10), and on the day of Pentecost, Peter proved that God had foreordained the king of the kingdom would be put to death (Act 2:23). It was not until after His death that Jesus was crowned with all power in heaven and earth (Mt 28:18). Jesus is king over His spiritual kingdom. Only His citizens can claim Him as their king (John 18:36). Jesus was made both Lord and Christ. The name Christ means anointed one. Jesus is both Lord and king (Acts 2:36). He is Lord over all men (Acts 10:36).

Jesus has been exalted with authority above every authority not only on this earth but also in heaven (Mt 28:18). He is approved as Lord not only in this life but also in that which to come (Eph 4:21). Jesus is not seated as king of a physical nation (John 8:23). He is king of the Jews but only in a spiritual sense (Rom 9:6-7). His kingdom is not of this world; it is not a physical kingdom (John 18:36). He is king of all people who are spiritual Jews (Rom 2:28-29). He is king only of those who are translated into His marvelous kingdom (Col 1:13).

The king of the Jews has made all His subjects priests to offer spiritual sacrifices (1 Pet 2:5-9; Heb 13:15). If His people suffer with Him, He will make them kings to reign with Him (2 Tim 2:12). If His citizens overcome the battle with Satan He will give them power over the nations as He received of His Father (Rev 2:26-27). If His citizens overcome they will reign with Him forever and ever (Rev 22:5).

Blessed be the King of the Jews!