UPCOMING TRADITIONAL HOLIDAYS AROUND THE WORLD

How many of the traditional holidays from around the world have more than a superficial connection?

Five Days Of Diwali

Diwali Calendar

History and significance of Diwali

Review of Religions: Ancient Sun Worship

Roman worship of the SUN GOD—Sol Invictus

Winter Solstice

Sun Worship | religion | Britannica.com

How Christmas Works

 

DARING THE DINOSAURS AND DRAGONS

DO WE DARE[i] THE DINOSAURS AND DRAGONS?

There still is some controversy surrounding the name Brontosaurus. When Marsh discovered some partial remains of this dinosaur in 1877 he named it Apatosaurus Ajax after the Greek god Ajax.[ii] However, when he discovered a more complete skeleton two years later, he named it Brontosaurus Excelsus.[iii] 

In 1903, scientists realized that these two specimens were actually the same type of dinosaur. With that being the case, according to the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature, the oldest name would be the correct one: however, the Brontosaurus name seemed to be more agreeable with the imagination of the public and continues to be used to this day.[iv]

An older illustration of several brontosaurus dinosaurs grazing in water.

Several computer simulations have been conducted on how the tail worked on the Brontosaurus.[v] One simulation—introduced in the 1997 issue of Discover Magazine—showed that the tail of these creatures behaved much like a bull whip does, and that by “cracking” its tail like a bullwhip, then this creature could produce a cracking sound that was over 200 decibels, or louder than the firing of a cannon.

JOB 40:15-24 Speaks of One Such Magnificent Land Animal

  1. Behold now behemoth, which I made with thee; he eateth grass as an ox.
  2. Lo now, his strength is in his loins, and his force is in the navel of his belly.
  3. He moveth his tail like a cedar: the sinews of his stones are wrapped together.
  4. His bones are as strong pieces of brass; his bones are like bars of iron.
  5. He is the chief of the ways of God: he that made him can make his sword to approach unto him.
  6. Surely the mountains bring him forth food, where all the beasts of the field play.
  7. He lieth under the shady trees, in the covert of the reed, and fens.
  8. The shady trees cover him with their shadow; the willows of the brook compass him about.
  9. Behold, he drinketh up a river, and hasteth not: he trusteth that he can draw up Jordan into his mouth.
  10. He taketh it with his eyes: his nose pierceth through snares (Job 40:15-24).

There are so many areas for discussion and controversy here. Questions abound, but the scriptural accounts seem to bear out what scientist have found.

    1. Was there enough vegetation to sustain them indefinitely?
    2. Should we believe man lived contemporaty with these beasts?
    3. Dinosaurs fascinate children, so why do we not delve more in to sacred literature to educate them.
    4. Is there any animal in secular history similar to these dinosaurs?
    5. With the presumed fierceness and fearlessness they possessed, what caused them to become extinct?
    6. Could this now extinct animal have been called by any other name?
    7. What ancient culture claims such a ferocious beast?

Read the following biblical account carefully and consider that some early  King James translators may not have understood because they had not lived with such beasts.  Several lesser animals were thought to be what the Lord calls Leviathan.

Job 41:1-34 Speaks of a Savage Sea Animal

  1. Canst thou draw out leviathan with an hook? or his tongue with a cord which thou lettest down?
  2. Canst thou put an hook into his nose? or bore his jaw through with a thorn?
  3. Will he make many supplications unto thee? will he speak soft words unto thee?
  4. Will he make a covenant with thee? wilt thou take him for a servant for ever?
  5. Wilt thou play with him as with a bird? or wilt thou bind him for thy maidens
  6. Shall the companions make a banquet of him? shall they part him among the merchants?
  7. Canst thou fill his skin with barbed irons? or his head with fish spears?
  8. Lay thine hand upon him, remember the battle, do no more.
  9. Behold, the hope of him is in vain: shall not one be cast down even at the sight of him?
  10. None is so fierce that dare stir him up: who then is able to stand before me?
  11. Who hath prevented me, that I should repay him? whatsoever is under the whole heaven is mine.
  12. I will not conceal his parts, nor his power, nor his comely proportion.
  13. Who can discover the face of his garment? or who can come to him with his double bridle?
  14. Who can open the doors of his face? his teeth are terrible round about.
  15. His scales are his pride, shut up together as with a close seal.
  16. One is so near to another, that no air can come between them.
  17. They are joined one to another, they stick together, that they cannot be sundered.
  18. By his neesings a light doth shine, and his eyes are like the eyelids of the morning.
  19. Out of his mouth go burning lamps, and sparks of fire leap out.
  20. Out of his nostrils goeth smoke, as out of a seething pot or caldron.
  21. His breath kindleth coals, and a flame goeth out of his mouth.
  22. In his neck remaineth strength, and sorrow is turned into joy before him.
  23. The flakes of his flesh are joined together: they are firm in themselves; they cannot be moved.
  24. His heart is as firm as a stone; yea, as hard as a piece of the nether
  25. When he raiseth up himself, the mighty are afraid: by reason of breakings they purify themselves.
  26. The sword of him that layeth at him cannot hold: the spear, the dart, nor the habergeon.
  27. He esteemeth iron as straw, and brass as rotten wood.
  28. The arrow cannot make him flee: slingstones are turned with him into stubble.
  29. Darts are counted as stubble: he laugheth at the shaking of a spear.
  30. Sharp stones are under him: he spreadeth sharp pointed things upon the mire.
  31. He maketh the deep to boil like a pot: he maketh the sea like a pot of ointment.
  32. He maketh a path to shine after him; one would think the deep to be hoary.
  33. Upon earth there is not his like, who is made without fear.
  34. He beholdeth all high things:he is a king over all the children of pride.

[i] https://www.freethesaurus.com/daring“>FreeThesaurus.com

[ii] <a href=”https://www.greekmythology.com/Myths/Mortals/Ajax/ajax.html”>Ajax: GreekMythology.com</a> – Oct 05, 2017

[iii] https://www.newdinosaurs.com/apatosaurus/

[iv] https://www.newdinosaurs.com/apatosaurus/

[v] https://www.livescience.com/52538-supersonic-sauropods.html 

Studying to Learn – Suggestion #4

Why are these study methods not generally taught? Everyone has a right to know how to search the scriptures to use them.

for the invisible

Studying to Learn - 4

I’ve saved the best for the last. Several years ago, one sweet lady from another congregation shared with our family a lesson she had done on obedience. Beginning in Genesis, she’d read through the entire Bible, noting Scriptures that mentioned obedience or anything to do with it. She had very few comments typed out at all – just Scriptures. But the Scriptures speak for themselves so clearly!

1 Corinthians 2:11-16

For what man knoweth the things of a man, save the spirit of man which is in him? even so the things of God knoweth no man, but the Spirit of God.

Who knows what God means by a verse better than God Himself? Who can explain what He means better than He can?

12 Now we have received, not the spirit of the world, but the spirit which is of God; that we might know the things that are freely…

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An Empty Mansion

These lessons about our song writers are well researched. I hope you will be inspired to study more about the hymns we sing.

hymnstudiesblog

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

“AN EMPTY MANSION”

“In my Father’s house are many mansions….I go to prepare a place for you” (Jn. 14:2)

INTRO.: A gospel song which centers upon the many mansions that Jesus is preparing in the Father’s house is “An Empty Mansion” (#198 in Hymns for Worship Revised, #392 in Sacred Selections for the Church). The text was written by Beuna Ora Bryant (Mrs. J. B.) Karnes, who was born on Feb. 8, 1889, in Comanche County, TX, and in 1911, at the age of 22, met and married Jess O’Brian Karnes, who had also been born in 1889. A series of events led up to the production of this song. In 1928, Jess, who was a successful builder in Abilene, TX, lost his lumber yard to a disastrous fire and had no insurance to cover the loss. A few months afterwards, the Great Depression began and their life’s…

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Studying to Learn – Suggestion #3

More encouragement and help…

for the invisible

Studying to Learn - 3

Daddy’s word study method was how I studied for a  very long time, and is still how I study a topic when I need to learn about it in a hurry. Bible software and “cut and paste” make it a pretty quick way to find many verses about a particular subject. However, there are lots of verses that have to do with certain topics, which don’t use that particular word in the passage – humility, for example. Not every passage which shows humility uses the word “humility” directly. That’s one of the things that encourages me about most of Granddad’s lessons; he brings in so much understanding from verses which you would not be able to find just by doing a word study.

I’m sure Granddad’s ability to “compare spiritual things with spiritual” (1 Corinthians 2:30) comes from many years of intense study and teaching. However, I discovered in the…

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