WHAT MAKES THE NEWS?

Video of 2-racing-buses-in-coimbatore-goes-viral.

Na! You can’t be serious!   No public servant would do such a thing!

Yes, some would and do.  This is not such an unusual occurrence as you might think.  When we go by car down the highways between villages, towns or cities, we often see the skeletal remains of busses that were not so successful at racing or “playing chicken.”  How many times have I seen the half slice of metal bones on the side of a highway? With all the seats gone on one side, one has to understand there were at least that many dead, while those whose seats remained on the other half were at least injured if not killed.

And sometimes it’s the kids!

Scenes like these were always the reason we took the trains instead of busses.

Such as this is not exactly good for the health would you say?

Never leave the house without a prayer for God’s protection.  Never assume you will return home without witnessing some near death experience.  Never assume you can do what you purpose to do without the Father (James 4:13-15).

Let us infuse this idea into our minds and hearts, so that we are completely pleasing to our Master.  And may He bless your day richly.

ELIXIR

The far reaching idea of an elixir may be seen by the many ways the word is used—elixir of life, fountain of life, panacea, cure-all, nostrum.

When ancient Chinese tribes found gunpowder for the first time, they obviously didn’t know what it was. Their journals and notes from that first discovery still exist, and the lead scientist called the power “an elixir of immortality” – which is pretty ironic considering it has led to more death than any other substance.

A metaphor is a figure of speech, which makes an implicit, implied or hidden comparison between two things that are unrelated but share some common characteristics. The link, 15 Famous Metaphors in the Bible, does not use the phrase water of life, but from other illustrations given there, one may identify it as a metaphor often used in Scripture.

There is such a comparison in John 7:37-39. “In the last day, that great day of the feast, Jesus stood and cried, saying, If any man thirst, let him come unto me, and drink. 38 He that believeth on me, as the scripture hath said, out of his belly shall flow rivers of living water. 39 (But this spake he of the Spirit, which they that believe on him should receive: for the Holy Ghost was not yet given; because that Jesus was not yet glorified.)”

A similar metaphor appears in John 4:7-15.  There cometh a woman of Samaria to draw water: Jesus saith unto her, Give me to drink.  8 (For his disciples were gone away unto the city to buy meat.)  9 Then saith the woman of Samaria unto him, How is it that thou, being a Jew, askest drink of me, which am a woman of Samaria? for the Jews have no dealings with the Samaritans.  10 Jesus answered and said unto her, If thou knewest the gift of God, and who it is that saith to thee, Give me to drink; thou wouldest have asked of him, and he would have given thee living water.  11 The woman saith unto him, Sir, thou hast nothing to draw with, and the well is deep: from whence then hast thou that living water?  12 Art thou greater than our father Jacob, which gave us the well, and drank thereof himself, and his children, and his cattle?  13 Jesus answered and said unto her, Whosoever drinketh of this water shall thirst again:  14 But whosoever drinketh of the water that I shall give him shall never thirst; but the water that I shall give him shall be in him a well of water springing up into everlasting life.  15 The woman saith unto him, Sir, give me this water, that I thirst not, neither come hither to draw.

Matthew 5:6—Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled.

Revelation 7:15-17—Therefore are they before the throne of God, and serve him day and night in his temple: and he that sitteth on the throne shall dwell among them. 16 They shall hunger no more, neither thirst any more; neither shall the sun light on them, nor any heat. 17 For the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living fountains of waters: and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.

FIGURATIVE USES:

Water of life
John 4:14
John 7:37-39
Revelation 21:6
Revelation 22:17

Water of affliction
2 Samuel 22:17-18
Psalms 69:1
Isaiah 30:20
Isaiah 43:2

Water of salvation
Isaiah 12:3
Isaiah 49:10
Isaiah 55:1
Ezekiel 36:25
John 4:10
John 7:38

Domestic love
Proverbs 5:15

SYMBOLICAL USES:
Proverbs 5:15
Isaiah 8:7
Revelation 8:11
Revelation 12:15
Revelation 16:4
Revelation 17:1
Revelation 17:15

Read deeply and consider the implications of the word elixir as it relates to the water of life in Scripture.

THE PRICE OF A LIFE

As a teen in high school, I became an avid reader, fascinated by the earliest of English literature with its accounts of the surfs and lords—presumably displaced Christians running from persecution—willing to serve in order to live. My curiosity and imagination went beyond my classmates’ because of Biblical accounts I related to the literature. Terms like “man price” and “wergild” immediately conjured relationships to Biblical laws regarding “cities of refuge” or the “avengers of blood.”

A classic literary example of a dispute over the wergild of a slave is contained in Iceland’s Egil’s Saga.

In the Story of Grettir the Strong, chapter 27, “The Suit for the Slaying of Thorgils Makson”, Thorgeir conveys to court Thorgils Arison’s offer of wergild as atonement for killing Thorgils Makson.

We read in the epic poem, Beowulf, a hero of the Geats in Scandinavia, that he comes to the aid of Hrothgar, the king of the Danes, whose mead hall (in Heorot) has been under attack by a monster known as Grendel. Beowulf paid wergild from his father to Hrothgar by killing the monster Grendel and his mother. Grendel and his mother were believed to be descended from Cain. After Beowulf slays him, Grendel’s mother attacks the hall and is then also defeated. Victorious, Beowulf goes home to Geatland in Sweden and later becomes king of the Geats. After a period of fifty years has passed, Beowulf defeats a dragon, but is fatally wounded in the battle. After his death, his attendants bury him in a tumulus, a burial mound, in Geatland.


Fair Use and Attribution

The modern novel, The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien, is another example of “man price” being paid. The journal of Isildur reveals that he was justified taking the One Ring as a wergild for the deaths of his father and brother in battle. Appendix A of The Return of the King also mentions a rich wergild of gold sent by Turin II, Steward of Gondor, to King Folcwine of Rohan, after the death of his twin sons in battle.

How do these secular accounts relate to Christian evidences and our need to see where these practices originated?

CITIES OF REFUGE

Six Levitical cities were set aside to provide shelter and safety for those guilty of manslaughter. Of the 48 cities assigned to the Levites, six were designated as cities of refuge, three on either side of the Jordan River (Numbers 35:6-7; Joshua 20:7-8). The three cities of refuge west of the Jordan were KEDESH in Galilee, in the mountains of Naphtali (Joshua 20:7; Joshua 21:32); SHECHEM, in the mountains of Ephraim (Joshua 20:7; Joshua 21:21; 1 Chronicles 6:67); and HEBRON, also known as KIRJATH ARBA, in the mountains of Judah (Joshua 20:7).

The three cities east of the Jordan River were BEZER, in the wilderness on the plateau, or plain, of Moab, and assigned to the tribe of Reuben (Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 20:8; Joshua 21:36), RAMOTH GILEAD, or Ramoth in Gilead, from the tribe of Gad (Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 20:8; Joshua 21:38); and GOLAN, in Bashan, from the half-tribe of Manasseh (Deuteronomy 4:43; Joshua 20:8; Joshua 21:27).

In the ancient Near East if a person were killed, it was the custom that the nearest relative became the “avenger of blood” (Numbers 35:19; Numbers 35:21-27; Deuteronomy 19:12). It became his duty to slay the slayer. However, if a person killed another accidentally or unintentionally, the cities of refuge were provided as an asylum, “that by fleeing to one of these cities he might live” (Deuteronomy 4:42).

The regulations concerning these cities are found in Numbers 35; Deuteronomy 19:1-13, and Joshua 20. If the manslayer reached a city of refuge before the avenger of blood could slay him, he was given a fair trial and provided asylum until the death of the high priest. After that the manslayer was permitted to return home; but if he left the city of refuge before the death of the high priest, he was subject to death at the hands of the avenger of blood.

According to Scripture, who or what was the avenger of blood?

Deuteronomy 19:12—Then the elders of his city shall send and fetch him thence, and deliver him into the hand of the avenger of blood, that he may die.

Joshua 20:3—That the slayer that killeth any person unawares and unwittingly may flee thither: and they shall be your refuge from the avenger of blood.

Joshua 20:5—And if the avenger of blood pursue after him, then they shall not deliver the slayer up into his hand; because he smote his neighbour unwittingly, and hated him not beforetime.

Joshua 20:9—These were the cities appointed for all the children of Israel, and for the stranger that sojourneth among them, that whosoever killeth any person at unawares might flee thither, and not die by the hand of the avenger of blood, until he stood before the congregation.

What were the cities of refuge?

Numbers 35:11—Then ye shall appoint you cities to be cities of refuge for you; that the slayer may flee thither, which killeth any person at unawares.

Numbers 35:14—Ye shall give three cities on this side Jordan, and three cities shall ye give in the land of Canaan, which shall be cities of refuge.

Joshua 20:2—Speak to the children of Israel, saying, Appoint out for you cities of refuge, whereof I spake unto you by the hand of Moses:

1 Chronicles 6:67—And they gave unto them, of the cities of refuge, Shechem in mount Ephraim with her suburbs; they gave also Gezer with her suburbs,

Identifying our Identity

This is said plainly but gently. I pray you will read and believe.

for the invisible

Identifying Our Identity

Studying steadily through the books of Law, we’ve been covering some of the physical laws God gave to the Israelites such as how to farm and how to dress. Though these were outward ordinances and no longer govern us, we know that they were given for our sakes, to teach us spiritual things (Gal 3:24, 2 Tim 3:16-17).

Leviticus 19:19

Ye shall keep my statutes. Thou shalt not let thy cattle gender with a diverse kind: thou shalt not sow thy field with mingled seed: neither shall a garment mingled of linen and woollen come upon thee.

Deuteronomy 22:11

Thou shalt not wear a garment of divers sorts, as of woollen and linen together.

Many of the Old Testament laws had to do with showing the meaning of holiness and purity. Something mixed wasn’t pure. God wanted even the fabric of their clothing to be pure. In fact, He commanded…

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